Birds, Plants, Stuff

By October 17, 2014 Uncategorized One Comment

Went out twitching today after a rare bird that was just plausible enough to be sighted in Durham…and discovered that some idiot had been listing the exotic waterfowl collection over at Duke. (I just map-quested the coordinates and didn’t realize where it was located until I got to the gardens and had a sudden sinking feeling. What I get for not checking closer.)

Oh, well. It got me out of the house, anyhow. I haven’t been birding in weeks, beyond glancing into the backyard occasionally. There are worse fates than a morning spent birding at Duke Gardens, even if it’s all yellowthroats and vireos.

Also, check out the SINGLE GREATEST LANDSCAPING USE OF PINK MUHLY GRASS IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD:

pinkmuhlywave

I mean, I grow this stuff, and this never occurred to me. (I don’t have a slope like that, mind you…) It’s a clumping native grass with pink seed heads, grows about two feet tall, gets a pretty good spread. Never ever seen it used like that.

Then I stopped at the Botanical Garden on the way home, and there went the rest of the morning. Did you know there is a plant called “Farkleberry”?! (Okay, it’s been rebranded as “Sparkleberry” and is a native holly, but seriously, that used to be “Farkleberry.” The little tag informed me solemnly that not even google knew the origins of “farkle.”)

So that was my morning. Didn’t suck, even with the not-actually-wild goose chase.

One Comment

  • Wolf Lahti says:

    “Not even google knew the origins of ‘farkle’.”

    “Aha!” I thought. “Surely I can shed light on this mystery with the aid of my trusty Oxford English Dictionary!” But alas, there is no entry for “farkle” there either. (American Heritage has an entry for “farkleberry” but gives no etymology.) All I can do is wave vaguely in the direction of Laugh-In reruns and mumble something indistinct about Mark Farkle, Sparkle Farkle, and Simon and Gar Farkle.

    (Please tell me I’m not the only one who remembers this.)